Overcoming the Challenges at Texas A&M Kyle Field due to the Changing Landscape of Always Connected Technology

Tellabs Optical LAN fiber-based stadium network is the foundation enabling Texas A&M’s Kyle Field to surpass previous game day data traffic peak usage. In order to meet the demands of all these new services without the cost and complexity of legacy technologies, TAMU chose a converged infrastructure, with optical fiber cabling and power delivery to the edge, for both LAN and DAS needs. 

The Basics of IoT (Navigating the “Soup”)

Much has been written about the Internet of Things (IoT) over the last few years, discussing both the explosive growth projections in the number of attached devices and the anticipated value to global business that they will bring. The growth projections alone are staggering. From 2013-2025 the numerical growth shows 100 billion IoT devices globally by 2025 with commercial/industrial electronics, communications and consumer making up the biggest segments.

IHS Markit: Global data center construction continues to grow

If there is a global recession in the offing, no one has told the top cloud and colocation providers. Global data center construction is booming, as the leading cloud and colocation providers will add an estimated 14 million-square-feet of capacity this year, according to a report by IHS Markit. In addition, another 4.5 million square-foot of capacity is already in the works for the first half of next year. IHS Markit is currently tracking 135 new data center building and expansion projects that are slated to finish this year.

What Congress Is (And Isn’t) Doing on 5G

It is doubtful that the 116th Congress will muster any broad-based response that will materially change the trajectory of the United States’s deployment of 5G technology or the security of the network. Because 5G will remain a private-sector-led initiative in the United States, the government’s role is limited largely to debating regulatory issues.

Cable Testing 101: What is the Difference Between OM3 and OM4?

OM3 and OM4 multimode fiber are two common types of fiber used in local area networks–typically in backbone cabling between telecommunications rooms and in the data center between main networking and storage area network (SAN) switches. Both of these fiber types are considered laser-optimized 50/125 multimode fiber, meaning they both have a 50 micron (µm) diameter core and a 125 µm diameter cladding, which is a special coating that prevents light from escaping the core. Both fiber types use the same connectors, the same termination and the same transceivers–vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) that emit infrared light at 850 nanometers (nm). So, what’s different?

In-Vehicle Optical Multi-Gigabit Communications

The automotive industry is currently seeking technologies to enable 10 Gbps communications. This derives from the growing need for data interchange between sensors and electronic control units in the car. Infotainment, ADAS and growing levels of autonomy are the key trends that explain the exponential growth of data rates: 100 Mbps to 1 Gbps and to 10 Gbps. Some OEMs are even talking about 25 and 50 Gbps for the upcoming years.10GBASE-SR is the current standard by IEEE that establishes a communications channel in optical fiber at 10 Gbps. Although well-established for industrial use, it is not suitable for automotive applications.