Category: Connectors

AFL Receives Six Patents Over Past Quarter

AFL, an international manufacturer of fiber optic cable, equipment and accessories, was awarded six new patents over the past quarter for technology and developments in optical connectivity, conductor accessories, specialty cables and test equipment.
The first patent is for “Multiple Cable Size Fiber Optic Transition Assemblies.” The design allows the ability to create furcated AFL TRIDENT® drops, from one to four fibers. Additionally, a patent was received for a “Rack Routing Guide.” This invention allows installers to route fibers exiting the front of panels into a system that takes up the slack when any tray inside the panel is opening.
Two patents were received in AFL’s conductor accessories division. The first patent is for “Cable Support Devices and Assemblies.” This design supports AFL’s FTTx solution, notably the end user’s focus on minimizing pole penetrations when attaching hardware. The multi-drop thimble eye allows up to four drops to be dead ended at a pole using a single bolt as an attachment.
The second patent for conductor accessories is “Galloping Motion Disruptors and Methods for Reducing Conductor Galloping.” The Galloping Motion Disruptor (GMD) changes the cross-sectional profile of a transmission conductor, reducing the wind energy effect that causes large movement of the conductor, which could lead to damage. This patented design allows easier installation and less shipping costs.
The next patent is for “Downhole Strain Sensing Cables.” This cable is designed for installation in oil and gas downhole applications that detect ground movement or strain within the well to assist in efficient well utilization and management.
Lastly, the Test & Inspection division received a patent for “Optical Testing Devices and Related Methods.” The patent allows an OTDR to automatically initiate a test when the OTDR test jumper is connected to a network. After the test jumper has been disconnected from the network, from sensing the unloaded signal, the OTDR will automatically start another test when the test jumper is reconnected to a network.

COMO LOS CONECTORES INFLUENCIAN EN LA CONFIABILIDAD DE UNA RED DE FIBRA ÓPTICA

Este webinar cubre la teoría básica de la transmisión de fibra óptica, las opciones de conectores, su inspección y mantenimiento. También cubre las pruebas de confiabilidad de los cables, su importancia y qué significa para la implementación de la red.
Al inspeccionar los conectores de fibra óptica, se encuentran que numerosos proveedores de conectores y cables que ofrecen muchas opciones. Un hecho relevante es que los usuarios finales han descubierto, en los últimos años, que “no todos los conectores son iguales. La calidad, confiabilidad y rendimiento de los componentes ópticos y los productos de ensamblaje de cables se aseguran seleccionando los mejores componentes desde su terminación y pulido, utilizando las mejores prácticas y equipos. El producto final debe cumplir o superar los requisitos de todas las especificaciones relevantes de la industria, como las normas GR-326 y GR-1435 reconocidas internacionalmente.
How Connectors Influence Fiber Optics Network Reliability
This webinar covers basic fiber optic transmission theory, connectors options, inspection and maintenance. It also covers assemblies’ reliability testing, why it is important, and what it means for network deployment.
When looking at fiber optic connectors, one will find numerous connector and cable suppliers offering many options. One key fact that end users have discovered in recent years is that ‘not all connectors are created equal’. The quality, reliability, and performance of optical components and cable assembly products are assured by selecting the best components and by terminating and polishing it using the best practices and equipment. The final product must meet or exceed the requirements of all relevant industry specifications, such as the internationally recognized GR-326 and GR-1435 standards.

Webinar: New MPO Multi-Fiber Connectors at the Tower – New Test Requirements for Fiber Inspection

The use of MPO (Multi-Fiber Push on) Connectors is growing in today’s Wireless networks. 5G is driving this change by requiring more bandwidth and fibers throughout the Mobility network. Traditional Fiber architectures include simplex and/or duplex Fiber connectors, these new MPO connectors present new and unique challenges to installation and maintenance at the Tower. This session will review the emergence of these new connectors, their place in 5G network architecture, new test requirements and challenges presented.

Simple Rule for Cleaning Optical Fibers

The performance of a fiber optic system depends heavily on the cleanliness of the interfaces. Dirt particles, grease, dust, etc. can have a highly negative impact on the transmission characteristics. They can actually destroy a fiber optic connection depending on the circumstances. If the connector is plugged in without first being tested, it could well be too late. The high pressure in the connection means that particles are immediately pressed in and this causes irreversible damage. This is why it is becoming increasingly important to test all connectors and adapters, and, if necessary, to clean them before they are mated – even new products that have just come out of the packing.

Webinar: 400G/800G Data Center Network Demands

The introduction of 400 Gbits/sec and now 800 Gbits/sec has created greater efficiencies to provide low-latency network access with significantly increased bandwidth, critical for hyperscale and cloud-scale organizations. The resulting new transceiver and connector options along with fiber constructions help to deliver data where you need it, when you need it, cost-effectively. These changes have architectural and on-site implications that involve network, cable infrastructure, installation and testing. This panel presentation and discussion will address these technology trends from different perspectives across the data center ecosystem.

How copper infrastructure can lead to fiber dividends

The Broadband Forum’s TR-419: Fiber Access Extension over Existing Copper Infrastructure report shows how fiber-based access can be provided to customers by utilizing existing copper infrastructure as opposed to the installation of fiber to end-users’ premises, which may not be economically or physically viable. FTTep (Fiber to the extension point) lets service providers deploy fiber-grade services by leveraging the last meters of copper to extend the fiber network without lowering quality when compared to complete FTTH (Fiber to the home) networks.