Category: Cabling

OM5 Fiber Application of SWDM

OM5 was chosen to be the new standard for the wideband multimode fiber in the upcoming 3rd edition of the ISO/IEC 11801. The acceptance of this standard is a milestone for the fiber cabling performance category because it extends the benefits of this revolutionary multimode fiber within connected buildings and data centers worldwide. Compared with OM3 and OM4, which are suitable for transmission in the range of 850nm wavelength, the new optical cabling class OM5 can operate within a range of 850nm to 950nm, thus increasing the performance and the quality of connectivity in your data center.

ICT in 2020—What’s In Store and How Can You Prepare?

A recent survey of professionals across the information and communications technology (ICT) industry indicates that user organizations have begun to adopt latest-generation technologies like the Internet of Things, and more users plan to do so in the near future. For professionals who design, install, or supply the physical-layer systems that support these technologies, it is essential to understand their bandwidth and power requirements. This webinar will review highlights of the survey, paying specific attention to the anticipated uptake of IoT devices, remote powering via Power over Ethernet, 5G, and end-user organizations’ plans to upgrade their cabling systems’ capabilities.

Fiber Capacity Mining, Then and Now

Ever since the invention of single mode fiber optic cable decades ago, the industry has continued to develop new ways of increasing the amount of data that can be transmitted over an optical fiber link. Two significant developments have improved fiber utilization: (1) the simultaneous transmission of multiple lasers of different wavelengths over a single fiber — a technique called wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), and (2) coherent transmission using digital signal processors (DSPs) to modulate and detect multi-levels in both phase and amplitude of laser light on two polarizations, resulting in increased spectral efficiency. This white paper reviews the technological advancements that have increased the capacity of information that can be transmitted over a single mode fiber link and discusses how parameters in coherent transmission such as modulation order, baud rate, and transmission shaping determine overall fiber capacity.

Do You Know about Active Optical Cables (AOCs)?

Active optical cables (AOCs) are used for short-range multi-lane data communication and interconnect applications. Usually, the wire transmission of optical communication should belong to passive part, but AOC is an exception. AOCs consist of multimode optical fiber, fiber optic transceivers, control chip and modules. They use electrical-to-optical conversion on the cable ends to improve speed and distance performance of the cable without sacrificing compatibility with standard electrical interfaces.

Webinar: Single-Mode Fiber – The perfect fit for your evolving network

The demands of new and emerging technologies – things like 5G, BIoT and DAS – present both opportunities and challenges for enterprise fiber networks. Until recently, multimode transceivers were orders of magnitude less expensive than their single-mode counterparts, making multimode the fiber of choice for many enterprise network designers. Today, the cost of single-mode transceivers has come down significantly, making the increased bandwidth and longer distances made possible by single-mode fiber much more attractive. This presentation discusses why you may want to include single-mode fiber in your enterprise network.

Cabling future-ready commercial office buildings

The concept of networking in office buildings evolving from a competitive selling feature to a necessary fourth utility alongside electricity, gas, and water has developed in the last 10 years. The need to enable more instrumentation and control points inside buildings requires wired and wireless networks to connect them back to the services that orchestrate their overall operations. The fourth utility has to span from basement to roof, and from carpeted floors to the parking garage. Cabling infrastructure that is not future-ready will require replacement or augmentation to accommodate the inevitable changes to the attached active electronics over the cabling’s 20-year useful life.