Category: Testing

Testing Vendor-Specified Channels

Wondering about standards compliance and testing requirements for extended-length twisted pair cabling? Sometimes there is pressure to connect a device beyond the guidance of the cabling standards. In an extended-reach channel, the installation will not be standards compliant. This may mean that the application support will be limited to certain data rates, certain cables and components, certain installation conditions, or is tied to certain types of network equipment. It could mean that the application support is not assured by the network equipment manufacturer, and instead falls to the cabling vendor. That might be just fine with your customer, but it’s best to make sure. You should educate them about the solution and the implications of non-standards compliant cabling. And just because something isn’t standards compliant, doesn’t mean you don’t have to test it.

Simple Rule for Cleaning Optical Fibers

The performance of a fiber optic system depends heavily on the cleanliness of the interfaces. Dirt particles, grease, dust, etc. can have a highly negative impact on the transmission characteristics. They can actually destroy a fiber optic connection depending on the circumstances. If the connector is plugged in without first being tested, it could well be too late. The high pressure in the connection means that particles are immediately pressed in and this causes irreversible damage. This is why it is becoming increasingly important to test all connectors and adapters, and, if necessary, to clean them before they are mated – even new products that have just come out of the packing.

Ways to Test Equipment Cords – The Weakest Links

Equipment cords are an integral part of any network—whether it’s a fiber jumper used to make connections between fiber patching areas and switches in the data center or a copper patch cord out in the LAN to connect end devices to the work area outlet. Unfortunately, they are also typically the weakest link in the network. They are handled and manipulated more than any other component, which makes them more subject to damage. They are also often considered a commodity item and some end users will seek to save money by purchasing them from lesser-known generic sources that may skimp on quality and compliance.

Let’s All Calibrate Test Equipments and Have a Good Time!

Like your car’s oil can wear out over time and become less effective at properly lubricating the engine, tester components can deviate from their original behavior. Part of the process of designing an accurate tester is determining what the appropriate calibration interval should be. Fluke reviews specifications as well as looking at real world experience with the thousands of testers in use. As with any electronic, resistors, capacitors and circuits can drift over time due to temperature, humidity and warming up and cooling down every time you turn your tester on and off. The circuit boards within the tester can also be contaminated by dust or other materials.

VIAVI : Expands the Industry’s Most Comprehensive Fiber Test Portfolio | MarketScreener

VIAVI Solutions has introduced new fiber test and measurement solutions, including new optical power meters, fiber characterization modules, and an enhanced Optical Time Domain Reflectometer (OTDR) solution which enable service providers, colocation and hyperscale data centers, enterprises and contractors to reduce costs, improve quality of service, minimize downtime and speed time to revenue.

What is Fiber Optic Sensing?

Fiber optic sensing uses the physical properties of light as it travels along a fiber to detect changes in temperature, strain, and other parameters. Fiber optic sensing utilizes the fiber as the sensor to create thousands of continuous sensor points along the fiber. This is called distributed fiber optic sensing using a distributed fiber optic sensor.

How smart infrastructure can become dangerously dumb

Poor-quality cable and installation practices are often not a priority or much of a concern to building owners and end users until a system goes down. Because cable infrastructure is installed behind the walls and out of sight, few people give a second thought to the criticality of cabling infrastructure until it is too late. And don’t forget, wireless devices are in fact connected by wires to transmitters and routers. It is generally accepted that approximately 70% of network downtime is due to cabling improprieties, which can include low-quality cable or poor termination practices. But, even worse than network failure is the safety risk due to a cable’s poor design, substandard material makeup and/or manufacturing deficiencies.