Category: Edge

Gathering Clouds to Unleash a Flood of Data: How will Data Centers Cope?

Increasingly, applications at the network edge—Internet of Things, artificial intelligence, machine-to-machine communications and the like—are generating tremendous amounts of data. Many such applications demand ultra-reliable low-latency (mid, single-digit millisecond) performance. The challenges of coping with this growing flood of data—to and from the edge—are keeping data center managers awake at night. Here’s what we know.

AT&T to deploy 5G network plus edge services to Deloitte University

AT&T and Deloitte University will bring 5G network connectivity and edge computing services to Deloitte to help the college transform the future of digital corporate learning and workplace collaboration in the university’s 700,000 sq. ft. leadership and learning center located near Dallas in Westlake, Texas. The new communications platform will help enable DU to explore new technologies and innovations to enhance experiential learning programs and overall guest experiences. MEC and 5G will be installed at the center to support specific use cases.

Edge computing and IoT – when intelligence moves to the edge

Both edge computing and fog computing are strongly on the rise for the same exact reasons: an IoT data deluge. This IoT data deluge, among others, takes place in the converging worlds of IT and OT (predominantly Industrial IoT) and occurs in general as we keep adding more IoT devices in the scope of mainly large-scale IoT projects, the industrial markets of Industry 4.0 and IoT use cases and applications where a lot of data needs to be analyzed and leveraged, often also in an IT and OT environment as we, for instance, find them in IoT in manufacturing.

Communications needs in manufacturing plants

Manufacturing plants and operations are each unique in their own way. In this article, we will discuss many of the communications opportunities that can equip new and existing buildings with more agile, resilient, and intelligent digital infrastructure. Manufacturing system architects are leveraging wired, wireless, and optical transport supporting robots, machine vision, production line machines, product transport, sensor arrays, programmable logic controllers (PLCs), and distributed Internet of Things (with future artificial intelligence management overlays) to increase process intelligence, agility, safety, and reduce defects and operational expenses.

What will a data center at the edge look like?

Edge sites are typically smaller than traditional data centers, requiring far less physical space, and often turning up in places that weren’t originally designed for IT networks. Edge computing racks often are deployed in closets or repurposed rooms in hospitals, schools, or even military sites in the middle of the desert. Key elements are: Monitoring, building in redundancies, securing the edge, closed-loop cooling systems, protection against the elements, and more.

4 What’s Driving Everyone To The Edge?

“What’s driving everyone to the edge?” From an enduser perspective, the demands for faster data processing and delivery of content and services to mobile devices will be unceasing. The projections are literally at a steeper angle than the growth of our national debt. The current structure of the internet and cloud and mobile networks can’t even begin to keep pace.

Five new ways to think about 5G: The speed trap

5G means that, for the first time, last-mile latency will often be less than backbone latency. If your data center is a long way from lots of your customers, your quality of service will be poorer (i.e. noticeably slower) than competitors with physically closer data centers. The potential answer to this problem has been around for a while – edge and fog computing. These may finally come into their own as last-mile latency drops and the sheer volume of data from the IoT skyrockets.