Splicing 200µm Ribbon – Getting Started on the Right Foot

The introduction of  200µm coated fibers in the market is causing a paradigm shift in cabling and splicing technology. These smaller fibers are found in loose fiber cables, and offer many benefits compared to standard 250µm loose fiber cables. The only real disadvantage is that currently most 200µm fiber applications can only be spliced one fiber at a time. If a technician wants to ribbonize these 200µm loose fibers for mass fusion splicing, the simplicity is lost.

Deadline extended for entering BICSI’s Cabling Skills Challenge to January 16

The deadline for entering BICSI’s 2020 Cabling Skills challenge has been extended to January 16. Race against the clock and your peers to complete industry tasks and emerge victorious. All current BICSI Installers and Technicians are eligible to enter, and selected competitors will receive a complimentary registration to the 2020 BICSI Winter Conference & Exhibition. Prizes for the Cabling Skills Challenge will be awarded and the grand champion will walk away with $5,000.

Inventors of bend-insensitive optical fiber to be inducted in National Inventors Hall of Fame

Three researchers from Corning, Dana Bookbinder, Ming-Jun Li, and Pushkar Tandon, who invented ClearCurve bend-insensitive optical fiber, will be inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame (NIHF) in Washington D.C. in May. They are among 22 inventors who will be inducted at that time. The announcement was made at the Consumer Electronics Show.

WESCO and Anixter sign $4.5-billion merger agreement

WESCO International Inc. and Anixter International Inc. boards of directors have unanimously approved a merger agreement under which WESCO will acquire Anixter in a transaction valued at approximately $4.5 billion. Anixter’s prior agreement to be acquired by Clayton, Dubilier & Rice LLC was terminated after CD&R waived its right to match WESCO’s $100-per-share offer for Anixter.

How to Test Shield Integrity?

The easiest way to test shield integrity is with a DC continuity test. Put a voltage on the cable at the near end, and if it shows up at the far end, it is assumed to be connected properly. While that is true for the conductors in the cable, it’s not necessarily true for the shield. That’s because the shield is connected to the exterior of the connector, and the connector is in physical contact with the rack panel.