Category: Fiber Handling

How the IPA shortage affects fiber cleaning practices

For years experts have been telling fiber-optic technicians not to use isopropyl alcohol (IPA) to clean fiber endfaces. Some technicians have listened; some haven’t. Today, one of Covid-19’s many effects on global commerce is the scarcity of IPA. Sticklers national accounts manager Rick Hoffman talks about the IPA shortage and its practical impact on fiber cleaning in this article.

Best Practices for Cleaning Fiber Optic Connectors

85% of network failures are caused by dirty connectors. The connectors entrusted to carry the critical information that passes through your network deserve far more than a wipe on a t-shirt. As data center bandwidth continues to increase, adherence to best practice fiber endface cleaning and inspection methods must improve. Download AFL’s best practices guide for cleaning.

Where the legend of John Henry meets fiber-optic connectivity

African-American folk hero John Henry is known both for his skill as a steel driving man and for his resistance to embrace new technology — in his case a steam-powered rock drilling machine. He raced against the machine only to die from heart failure, hammer in hand. How does this relate to fiber connectivity? Many fiber optic splicers still hand-strip fibers one at a time when they could be using thermal strippers which is not only faster but also won’t damage the fiber.

A sticky situation: Removing static improves fiber network performance

Static is an invisible hazard to fiber-optic networks. Electrostatic charges draw and hold unwanted dust particles onto fiber network connector endfaces just like a magnet. Although this dust contamination is merely microns in size and only visible when magnified with an inspection scope, it can still cause serious performance problems for a network. Dust in a signal’s path may change or obstruct the light’s index of refraction, or the route of the signal, through the fiber. This causes insertion loss that weakens the signal and slows down the network speed. And if the refraction angle is altered enough, the network signal may be lost altogether.

Women in BICSI competitor takes 1st place in BICSI Cabling Skills Challenge

Congratulations Ashley Kellison, Network Engineer II and Adjunct Instructor Network Technology at Ozarks Technical Community College for winning 1st place for Installer 1 & copper cable terminations/Firestopping and Bonding & Grounding! Ashley was Women In BICSI’s 6th Annual Cabling Skills Challenge competitor. And thank you to our major sponsor Sumitomo Electric Lightwave, represented by Mary Adams, Applications Engineer, and our Scholarship Program Manager Cyndi Garrison of Five Points Infrastructure Services, a long-time sponsor and supporter of Women In BICSI.

FOA Fiber U Lesson Plan: Basic Fiber Optics Skills Lab

Can You Learn Fiber Optic Skills Online? If you have your own tools and components and like to learn on your own, you probably can. The Fiber U “Basic Skills Lab” has lessons for learning cable preparation, splicing, termination and testing. Just download the new workbook sections on each topic along with the VHO “virtual hands-on” tutorials, and you are ready to practice with your own equipment.