Category: Fiber Handling

Cabling Mistakes #10: Skipping Fiber Inspection Steps

Contaminated connections are the number one cause of fiber-related problems and failures in a data center, Enterprise backbones and other fiber networking environments. The #10 most common cabling mistake is skipping out on proper fiber inspection! One tiny speck of dirt on the fiber core can cause loss and reflections that increase error rates and degrade performance.

Is Your Fiber End Face Up to Scratch?

Contamination remains the number one cause of fiber link failures. Defects on a fiber end-face come in all types, shapes and sizes. They include scratches, cracks, and pits and contaminants like dirt, dust, oil and even salt. If you properly clean a fiber end-face with lint-free wipes and a specialized solvent designed specifically for fiber cleaning, it’s possible to remove contaminants from the fiber end-face. But what about permanent surface defects like scratches, cracks and pits that can’t be removed via cleaning?

Need a Change? Getting Started in Fiber Optics, 2019 Style

To get started in fiber optics, you need to follow a simple path. Start with your abilities. Do you have the dexterity to do the kinds of work fiber optic techs do? You need fine motor skills to work with hair-thin fibers and color perception to mate the right fibers and cables when splicing. For outside plant work, you also may need to be able to perform heavy construction duties.

Part 1: Three ways to grow multi-operator in-building services

The demand for in-building services continues to grow. Flexible working practices have led to a focus on cellular services for everyday operations. An increase in BYOD policies ultimately means a greater reliance on high quality, multi-operator cellular services. The delivery of multi-operator, venue-funded in-building cellular services are dependent on three elements; 1) wider mobile network operator acceptance of the challenge and the resolve to look at new solutions and operational models; 2) technical solutions that have common acceptance across all operators and 3) the expertise required to deploy and manage such a service.

Webinar: the Road to Single-mode Fiber

This Webinar addresses the factors driving the adoption of SMF in short reach data center applications, duplex vs. MTP options, understanding insertion loss budgets, optimizing your cabling system for density,  cable and end face testing tips, and trouble shooting using an OTDR. Great information to make sure you put your SMF project on the right track.
 

What Ever Happened to the Mechanical Splice?

While mechanical splice connectors have come a long way and are an ideal field termination method for connectorizing fiber, we rarely hear much anymore about mechanical splicing as a means for joining fibers along a link – even though it eliminates the need for expensive fusion splicing equipment. Fusion splicing, where cleaved fibers are aligned and fused by an electric arc, provides the lowest loss and strongest, most reliable joint.