Webinar: Minimizing Fiber Cable Plant ‘Angst’ when Migrating from 10G thru 400G

To achieve successful migration to 40 or 100-200-400 Gb, it is important to consider the fiber/transceiver options and cost implications (particularly the cost of managing high volumes of fiber cable on distribution frames and in pathways). During this webinar will show the advantages of a high-performance MM fiber coupled with BiDi transceivers as a cost effective migration option that proves very practical in minimizing fiber distribution element ‘sprawl’ and assuring that cable pathways are manageable.

Connect the dots

The one constant that holds true to all fiber optic connectors is the importance of the surface quality of the fiber optic connector end-face. Scratches, embedded dust particles and residues in the contact zone of a mated connector pair will disrupt the path through which the light travels, as it crosses out of the transmitting connector’s end-face into the receiving connector’s end-face. The best way to get optimal performance from fiber optic connections is to proactively inspect and clean both ends of a mated connector pair.

How fiber cleanliness is crucial to 5G connectivity

To assure reliability and performance, and avoid potential problems such as insertion loss (weakened signal), back reflection (signal is diverted back to its source), or a total system shutdown, it’s  essential that all connections are perfectly clean. This is especially important with a 5G network because every milliwatt of power is necessary for optimum connectivity and peak performance.

Are Utilities Ready for Smart Buildings?

One of today’s highly promising innovations in energy operations is grid-interactive efficient buildings. Referred to as GEBs, these structures are connected to the grid and draw on distributed energy sources. Among other benefits, GEBs offer hold the potential to lower property operations costs. But are utilities keeping up? A new study from the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy tackles that question.

Tackling the convergence of data centers and central offices

Supporting low-latency data applications and ‘standard’ telco services in the same facility will require operators to develop two different mindsets. At the same time as supporting the “rip and replace” data center approach, it will also be necessary to support the evolving needs of the traditional central office infrastructure over a long lifetime. But, as with any change in approach, it’s inevitable that planning and managing converged services in central offices will require its own best practices – and offer its own unique challenges.

Five new ways to think about 5G: The speed trap

5G means that, for the first time, last-mile latency will often be less than backbone latency. If your data center is a long way from lots of your customers, your quality of service will be poorer (i.e. noticeably slower) than competitors with physically closer data centers. The potential answer to this problem has been around for a while – edge and fog computing. These may finally come into their own as last-mile latency drops and the sheer volume of data from the IoT skyrockets.