University of Washington units share three-year NSF grant to make ‘internet of things’ more secure

Several University of Washington schools and offices will team up to research how organizational practices can affect the interagency collaboration needed to keep the “internet of things” — and institutional systems — safe and secure. Devices connected to the internet of things, now becoming standard components in new buildings, can increase energy performance while reducing costs. But such highly connected sensors can also bring potential security vulnerabilities.

Luminescence Thermometry on the Route of the Mobile‐Based Internet of Things (IoT): How Smart QR Codes Make It Real

Quick Response (QR) codes are a gateway to the Internet of things (IoT) due to the growing use of smartphones/mobile devices and its properties like fast and easy reading, capacity to store more information than that found in conventional codes, and versatility associated to the rapid and simplified access to information.

Ebook: Is your physical infrastructure friend or foe?

Your physical network and electrical infrastructure plays a vital role  in your organization’s ability to maximize operational, financial, and environmental efficiencies. In the eBook, Physical Infrastructure: Uncover a Hidden Competitive Advantage, focuses on threats to underperforming network and electrical infrastructure and how to locate them within your operation; latest technology advancements, trends, and new initiatives; and how a strong physical infrastructure is key to future-proofing your business and staying ahead of the competition.

101 Series: Set Your Reference Like a Wizard!

When it comes to testing fiber systems, connector loss refers to the loss of a mated pair of connectors – it’s actually impossible to measure a single connector. To test the loss of the first connector, it must be mated to a similar, known quality connector. That’s where Test Reference Cords (TRCs) come in. But you’ve got to take into account the loss of the TRCs by calibrating your tester to 0 dB of loss. This is done by setting a reference, and it is the most important step in Tier 1 fiber testing using an optical loss test set (OLTS). Setting a reference needs to be done whenever the TRC has been removed from the output port on your tester, and whenever the TRC has been cleaned and inspected.

Webinar: Flexible Design Choices With 10G Passive Optical LANs

The lifecycle of a traditional enterprise Ethernet switch, supported by copper cable, is 5 to 7 years. POLs eliminate the need to rip and replace network infrastructure, requiring changes only to the endpoints. This webinar will focus on the deployment of optical line terminals, passive optical splitters and optical network terminals to optimize enterprise network architecture for modern-day applications like IoT, cloud, network-as-a-service and wireless.

Webinar: Emerging Applications for Optical Fiber

Today’s networks are more demanding than ever—always on, always reliable, and no downtime regardless of application or environment. Instead of responding to issues once they occur, owners and operators are looking for ways to proactively manage their infrastructure. How can issues be detected and addressed before they happen, so reliability is guaranteed and downtime is eliminated? Imagine being able to detect small acoustic, temperature, and/or strain changes anywhere along an optical cable in an outside-plant environment, continuously, accurately, and in real-time. And depending on the source used, you could have the ability to detect various environmental events at distances from ones to tens of kilometers away, with large numbers of distributed virtual sensors along the path. All this is possible by using optical fiber as an intrinsic sensing medium.