Tag: Standards

Webinar: Single Pair Ethernet Standards Update, Use Cases and Applications

Single Pair Ethernet is poised to enable a new class of low power devices that will facilitate networking and powering the billions of endpoint sensors forecasted by the year 2022. The SPE standards provide endpoint sensors with a unifying communication protocol and a common networking infrastructure extending the cost-effectiveness and plug-and-play simplicity of Ethernet. Endpoint sensor technology and use cases are evolving rapidly in industrial/process, building automation, data centers as well as to support “Intelligent Building” technologies; IoT infrastructure. TIA’s TR-42 committee is developing single pair telecommunication standards for single pair infrastructure topologies, cabling, and field testing.

Single-Pair Ethernet: The Smart Choice for Intelligent Buildings

As Ethernet transmission speeds increased, the IEEE recognized the need for additional options to sup-port lower-speed transmission rates for specific applications and environments.As a result, the most recent addition to the IEEE Std 802.3 standard is the IEEE Std 802.3cg-2019 amendment specifying 10-Mbit/sec transmission over single balanced twisted-pair copper ca-bling. While initially targeted at industrial and automotive environments, there are also opportunities for building automation functions. This article will examine the network architecture and use cases made possible by the application of this new technology in support of published SPE standards.

Program provides certification to TIA’s 942 data center standard

Data center facilities that earn the TIA’s accreditation undergo an audit to ensure they comply with the association’s standards for data center infrastructure. There program includes two types of audits and certification services: Data Center Design Validation (DCDV) and Data Center Conformity Certification (DCCC). The DCDV’s objective is to ensure that the proposed design drawings for new-build or as-built drawings of existing data centers, are complete and that the design, on paper, meets the requirements of the standard. The objective of the DCCC is to verify the data center has been implemented in conformity to the validated designs in the DCDV phase and the requirements specified in the ANSI/TIA-942. 

50 Gbps Automotive Optical Ethernet demo

With the increase in Advanced Driver-Assistance Systems (ADAS), and the industry looking at autonomous vehicles on the horizon, the intelligent car needs growing bitrates to flow through its nervous system. The protocol of choice to implement the communication infrastructure in the car is Ethernet, and the 802.3 Working Group of the IEEE standardization organization is already paving the way to have multi-gigabit per second optical Ethernet in vehicles. A dedicated Study Group is already working on the future IEEE 802.3cz standard.

Ethernet consortium announces completion of 800GbE spec

The Ethernet Technology Consortium has announced the completion of a specification for 800 Gigabit Ethernet technology. Based on many of the technologies used in the current top-end 400 Gigabit Ethernet protocol, the new spec is formally known as 800GBASE-R.The 800GbE spec adds new media access control (MAC) and physical coding sublayer (PCS) methods, which tweaks these functions to distribute data across eight physical lanes running at a native 106.25Gbps. The 800GBASE-R specification is built on two 400 GbE 2xClause PCSs to create a single MAC which operates at a combined 800Gbps.

Testing Plug-Terminated Links—Internationally

The Modular Plug Terminated Link, or MPTL, where a horizontal cable run terminated on one end to an RJ-45 plug connects directly into a device, has become increasingly popular for connecting a variety of devices—from wireless access points and security cameras, to PoE lights and video displays—essentially wherever it’s deemed impractical or unsafe to deploy an outlet and equipment cord. Approved within ANSI-TIA 568.2-D as an option for connecting devices, MPTLs aren’t just popular in North America. But some of you have asked about regions that don’t follow TIA standards, and if it possible to test an MPTL to ISO/IEC or CENELEC standards. While the short answer is “not yet,” you can still make sure your MPTLs will perform.