Category: Ethernet

Keeping Contractors and Crews Safe from COVID-19

Electrical contractors and engineering firms can do their part to prevent more cases of the coronavirus in their communities. For example, on its website, the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) has set up a Coronavirus Resource Center. The association offers the following tips from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to protect workers.

The Ethernet of Things

Sure, you’ve heard of the #InternetOfThings. But, what about the #Ethernet of Things? Learn how more power from #PoE is helping to connect the world. Wired Ethernet connections may seem like ancient technology sitting in the rear-view mirror beside fax machines, dialup modems and dot matrix printers. Yet Ethernet, with its low latency, dedicated bandwidth and power delivery capabilities, is actually one of the key building blocks for the infrastructure that will enable the wireless IoT to continue to expand.

TIA initiates work on new Single Pair Multi-Drop (SPMD) copper cabling, component spec

TIA’s TR-42.7 Engineering Committee on Telecommunications Copper Cabling Systems (568) has issued a call for interest for document ANSI/TIA-568.6, initially titled, “Single Pair Multi-Drop (SPMD) cabling and component specifications.” The standard will address the need to support applications that use a bus topology with multiple branches connecting communication devices.

How Ethernet Has Enabled Today’s Hyper-Connected World

One of the most important elements to the success of the Internet even from its earliest days nearly 40 years ago is Ethernet. Bob Metcalfe, known as the Father of Ethernet, came together with peers to invent and develop the Ethernet local-area network (LAN) technology and its system of packet protocols. This allowed personal computers to efficiently share files and printers, a major advancement for its time.

When Plug-and-Play Really Isn’t

Industry standards such as Ethernet and USB help ensure the interoperability of the computers, peripherals, and networks we depend on every day. Compliance testing is essential because any level of incompatibility can be costly in time and money for vendors and end-users. Here’s a big surprise: if you peruse the compliance criteria, plug-and-play may be less robust than we might imagine. The underlying issue is the cascade of incompatibility percentages. When the interoperability numbers from connected devices are multiplied, the result is low enough to introduce significant risk. This is especially true for automated test systems.