Category: Best Practices

Wet-to-dry fiber cleaning: A good way to ensure network reliability

Expert opinions vary, but many agree that up to 75% of all fiber network problems are caused by contamination of patch cords, adapters, alignment sleeves or transceivers. Dirty endface connectors in particular are a real hazard to modern fiber-optic networks. The higher the light frequency in a network, the greater its sensitivity to contamination. This means that faster 5G networks, which need every milliwatt of power to function flawlessly, are more vulnerable to contamination.

Pearson Technologies updates FTTH/PON hands-on training programs

Pearson Technologies recently updated three Fiber-To-The-Home/Passive Optical Network (FTTH/PON) hands-on training programs. One is an installation program, another a design program, and the third is a combination of design and installation. “Since the principles for design and installation of both FTTH/PON and optical LANs are similar, these programs develop the knowledge, skills and abilities (SKAs) for both,” Pearson Technologies said when announcing the updates.

Simple Rule for Cleaning Optical Fibers

The performance of a fiber optic system depends heavily on the cleanliness of the interfaces. Dirt particles, grease, dust, etc. can have a highly negative impact on the transmission characteristics. They can actually destroy a fiber optic connection depending on the circumstances. If the connector is plugged in without first being tested, it could well be too late. The high pressure in the connection means that particles are immediately pressed in and this causes irreversible damage. This is why it is becoming increasingly important to test all connectors and adapters, and, if necessary, to clean them before they are mated – even new products that have just come out of the packing.

Ways to Test Equipment Cords – The Weakest Links

Equipment cords are an integral part of any network—whether it’s a fiber jumper used to make connections between fiber patching areas and switches in the data center or a copper patch cord out in the LAN to connect end devices to the work area outlet. Unfortunately, they are also typically the weakest link in the network. They are handled and manipulated more than any other component, which makes them more subject to damage. They are also often considered a commodity item and some end users will seek to save money by purchasing them from lesser-known generic sources that may skimp on quality and compliance.

TIA Chairman address top ICT issues post Covid

Read this interview with Doug Moore, Chairman of TIA’s Board of Directors and CEO of Fujitsu Network Communications. Moore explores the issues currently facing the ICT industry as the world begins to emerge after more than a year under work-from-home and social distancing advisory orders and discusses the challenges and opportunities lie ahead for our industry.

Design and installation practices for ultra-high-density fiber-optic cabling systems

The need to connect data center facilities to one another, frequently referred to as data center interconnect (DCI), has been a primary driver for optical-fiber and fiber- optic cable manufacturers to develop products containing thousands of fibers. We refer to cables with 1728 or more fibers as ultra-high-density cables, and this article examines those products.