Tag: Fluke Networks

Webinar: Ready for Four Pair PoE?

New devices based on the 802.3bt standard will supply up to 90 watts over four twisted pairs, supporting a new generation of PoE-supported devices. This webinar will give you the background you need to specify, install and troubleshoot these devices, including: How it Works, Cable Bundling Considerations, Field Termination Considerations, Cabling Performance, and Installing and Troubleshooting.

Bandwidth and Data Rates

The terms bandwidth and data rates are often used interchangeably, but they are in fact very different if you work in the cabling world. Your internet provider may advertise a bandwidth of 500 megabits per second (Mbps). In that case, they actually mean data rate. In the cabling world, bandwidth is a property of the cable – its ability to transmit a signal that’s intelligible at the far end. Any signal put on a copper or fiber link will degrade as it gets to the far end. This is a result of simple loss, but also more complex factors such as return loss (reflections), and in the case of copper, crosstalk. Vendors design their copper and fiber cabling to be able to deliver these raw signals (bandwidth) at higher rates.

Going for gold: Recognizing substantial levels of innovation

Gold-level awards are earned by organizations whose innovations are judged to be excellent, and whose benefits are clear. Each gold-level innovation makes a substantial improvement over previous methods employed, approaches taken, or products and systems used. 2019 Cabling Innovators Gold Awards include products and customer use cases from AFL, Belden, Chatsworth, CommScope, Corning, Credo Semiconductor, Esticom, Fluke Networks, Drybit, Jonard Tools, Legrand, Leviton, OFS, Panduit, R&M, Rosenberger, Senko, Siemon, Softing, Sumix, Sunbird, Superior Essex, and Wirewerx.

Celebrating groundbreaking achievements with Platinum Innovators Awards

During the 2019 Cabling Innovators Awards ceremony, the final set of awards presented, the Platinums, have been judged to be superb innovations, characterized by a groundbreaking approach to meeting a need, or establishing a new level of performance, efficiency, ease-of-use, and other beneficial qualities. Here the 2019 Cabling Innovators Platinum Award honorees including: AFL, Belden, Cailabs, CommScope, Dura-Line, Cable Ferret, Fluke Networks, Panduit, and the Siemon Company.

Cable Testing 101: Understanding Near and Far End Crosstalk

Crosstalk is the phenomenon by which a signal transmitted on one pair or one channel creates an undesired affect on another pair or channel. It causes interference on an affected pair of conductors or overall cable creates errors or prevents data transmission. But are you aware of the difference between the near end and far end crosstalk parameters you need to test for in balanced copper network cabling systems?

Cable Testing 101: There’s No Gain with “Gainers”

A fiber optic connector that puts out more power than it receives? Sounds like a miracle, but it’s actually a mistake. Read about the infamous “gainer” and why it’s not a good thing. Gainers can show up when using an OTDR to measure loss from one end of a fiber link, and they occur due to the way in which an OTDR measures reflected light along the length of the fiber. An OTDR assumes that fiber characteristics such as core and cladding size are consistent along the length with no variations, and it calculates signal loss based on the amount of reflected light, or backscatter, that it detects.

Cable Testing 101: Measuring Insertion Loss for Fiber and Copper

The amount of energy that a signal loses as it travels along a cable link used to be referred to as attenuation.The longer the cable, the greater the attenuation. For network cabling, standards now more correctly use the term “insertion loss” which refers to the loss of the signal strength at the far end of a link and includes the attenuation caused by the cable and any connection points along the way (i.e., connectors and splices), as well as any signal lost to reflections of the signal. Despite this correction in terminology, the limits, test procedures and requirements have not changed.