Tag: Fluke Networks

The OM Mantra

Adopted by TIA, the nomenclature for multimode fiber found in the ISO/IEC 11801 standard includes the prefix “OM.” Rather than the spiritual mantra you hear in yoga class, most sources in our industry state that the acronym OM comes from “optical multimode” which seems rather obvious. But when it comes to the various nuances of each type of OM, the differences aren’t quite as obvious. There are currently five types of OM fiber—OM1, OM2, OM3, OM4 and OM5. OM1 fiber was the de facto choice for fiber throughout the 1980s and 1990s, and was still installed into the early 2000s. OM1 has a core diameter of 62.5 µm while OM2, OM3, OM4 and OM5 all feature a 50 µm core.

Get Reel Before You Install!

While it would be nice to think that every reel of cable coming out of the factory is in perfect condition, that’s not always the case. Furthermore, what’s not to say that the reel wasn’t damaged during shipping and handling? Just imagine testing the cable plant after installation only to find out that the cable is faulty—now that’s time and money lost! Testing and documenting newly-delivered spools can also let you determine reel-to-reel consistency to keep your cabling vendors honest. Not to mention that it can help determine the cable was mishandled during installation, refuting blame by giving you proof that all was good before installation.

Webinar: Installing, Terminating, and Testing High-Density Fiber-Optic Cable

As fiber-optic cabling continues to grow in popularity, it is being installed in more types of environments than ever before. Some of these environments have inherent restrictions on or challenges to routing, installation, termination, and verification practices. While some recommended practices apply across a broad range of applications and environments, other fiber deployments require unique or specialized practices. This webcast looks at fiber deployment in different environments, including an examination of multiple termination styles, proper test procedures, cleaning processes, and inspection techniques.

Testing Plug-Terminated Links—Internationally

The Modular Plug Terminated Link, or MPTL, where a horizontal cable run terminated on one end to an RJ-45 plug connects directly into a device, has become increasingly popular for connecting a variety of devices—from wireless access points and security cameras, to PoE lights and video displays—essentially wherever it’s deemed impractical or unsafe to deploy an outlet and equipment cord. Approved within ANSI-TIA 568.2-D as an option for connecting devices, MPTLs aren’t just popular in North America. But some of you have asked about regions that don’t follow TIA standards, and if it possible to test an MPTL to ISO/IEC or CENELEC standards. While the short answer is “not yet,” you can still make sure your MPTLs will perform.

Fluke Networks Announces the FiberInspector™ Ultra, the Most Complete, Most Efficient Endface Inspection Solution

The FI-3000 FiberInspector™ Ultra from Fluke Networks allows fiber optic technicians to find contamination – the most common cause of fiber failure – on nearly any fiber connection. Technicians using the FI-3000 can get a Live View of the fiber endface instantly on their phone or Versiv Cabling Certification System and then use a gesture-based interface to zoom in on individual fibers or perform a pass/fail test in seconds. FiberInspector Ultra tests single fiber and MPO with SmartPhones or Versiv.