Tag: Fluke Networks

Fluke Networks Announces the FiberInspector™ Ultra, the Most Complete, Most Efficient Endface Inspection Solution

The FI-3000 FiberInspector™ Ultra from Fluke Networks allows fiber optic technicians to find contamination – the most common cause of fiber failure – on nearly any fiber connection. Technicians using the FI-3000 can get a Live View of the fiber endface instantly on their phone or Versiv Cabling Certification System and then use a gesture-based interface to zoom in on individual fibers or perform a pass/fail test in seconds. FiberInspector Ultra tests single fiber and MPO with SmartPhones or Versiv.

All Fiber Roads Divisible by 2 and 8

By now you’ve probably heard of 8-fiber MPO plug and play solutions available on the market, which are ideal for Gigabit (40GBASE-SR4) and 100 Gigabit (100GBASE-SR4) applications that use 8 fibers with 4 transmitting and 4 receiving at either 10 or 25 Gb/s. Unlike 12-fiber MPO solutions where 4 of the 12 fibers go unused, 8-fiber MPO solutions offer 100% fiber utilization in these applications. When looking ahead to future fiber applications, 8-fiber MPO solutions continue to make the most sense because all future duplex, parallel optic and WDM-based fiber applications are divisible by either 2 or 8 fibers – not 12.

Industrial Ethernet Connector Round-Up

IIoT brings together a range of industrial devices that all communicate over a common Ethernet protocol, enabling the sharing of information across multiple industrial systems.  Industrial Ethernet connectors need to stand up to harsher mechanical factors (vibration, force and impact), the potential for ingress (dust and liquids), climate and chemicals (temperature, radiation and pollutants) and electromagnetic interference – these factors determine standards-based M.I.C.E. parameters for classifying components in an industrial network.This article looks at the types of connectors available for emerging industrial Ethernet applications.

Blogs – Bi-Directional testing with an OTDR

Have you ever wondered how a Standard and an Application Note differ? A standard is developed by many experts using consensus to provide accurate technical information and guidance while an Application Note, while technically accurate, is developed by one vendor to position their brand. One case in point is bi-directional testing using an OTDR. Many application notes have been written about bi-directional testing with an OTDR but what do the Standards say?

Sometimes…It’s the Cable

Sometimes, when there are problems in the field, it’s just bad cable. We’re talking about cable that is bad, off the spool before the installer has even had a chance to touch it. This is not a common occurrence, but it’s something we’re prepared for and you should be, too. The vast majority of the time, it’s because someone cut corners and went for the budget special from some unknown manufacturer, but even reputable manufacturers have slipped up. Here’s an example that came into out Technical Assistance Center (TAC) just last month.

How to Test Shield Integrity?

The easiest way to test shield integrity is with a DC continuity test. Put a voltage on the cable at the near end, and if it shows up at the far end, it is assumed to be connected properly. While that is true for the conductors in the cable, it’s not necessarily true for the shield. That’s because the shield is connected to the exterior of the connector, and the connector is in physical contact with the rack panel.