Tag: Testing

How fiber cleanliness is crucial to 5G connectivity

To assure reliability and performance, and avoid potential problems such as insertion loss (weakened signal), back reflection (signal is diverted back to its source), or a total system shutdown, it’s  essential that all connections are perfectly clean. This is especially important with a 5G network because every milliwatt of power is necessary for optimum connectivity and peak performance.

Bandwidth and Data Rates

The terms bandwidth and data rates are often used interchangeably, but they are in fact very different if you work in the cabling world. Your internet provider may advertise a bandwidth of 500 megabits per second (Mbps). In that case, they actually mean data rate. In the cabling world, bandwidth is a property of the cable – its ability to transmit a signal that’s intelligible at the far end. Any signal put on a copper or fiber link will degrade as it gets to the far end. This is a result of simple loss, but also more complex factors such as return loss (reflections), and in the case of copper, crosstalk. Vendors design their copper and fiber cabling to be able to deliver these raw signals (bandwidth) at higher rates.

Operators May Move to Standalone 5G Faster Than Anticipated

From measuring 5G to 4G handovers to testing signal distortion, executives from several top network-testing firms say that 5G is so dramatically different from LTE that operators are spending a lot more time testing their networks than in previous network upgrades. Interestingly, test equipment makers say that operators launching the non-standalone (NSA) version of 5G in millimeter-wave spectrum such as 28GHz and 39GHz are now considering moving to the standalone (SA) 5G version more quickly because of the complexity of non-standalone 5G.

Cable Testing 101: There’s No Gain with “Gainers”

A fiber optic connector that puts out more power than it receives? Sounds like a miracle, but it’s actually a mistake. Read about the infamous “gainer” and why it’s not a good thing. Gainers can show up when using an OTDR to measure loss from one end of a fiber link, and they occur due to the way in which an OTDR measures reflected light along the length of the fiber. An OTDR assumes that fiber characteristics such as core and cladding size are consistent along the length with no variations, and it calculates signal loss based on the amount of reflected light, or backscatter, that it detects.

EXFO : introduces industry’s first integrated test solution for troubleshooting DWDM networks

EXFO introduces the Optical Wave Expert, the first device to integrate DWDM channel power validation and intelligent OTDR fault-locating capabilities on a single port. Designed to save multiple service operators (MSOs) time and money, the Optical Wave Expert equips field technicians to automatically measure, diagnose and troubleshoot optical fiber links.