Tag: OM5

OM5 Fiber Application of SWDM

OM5 was chosen to be the new standard for the wideband multimode fiber in the upcoming 3rd edition of the ISO/IEC 11801. The acceptance of this standard is a milestone for the fiber cabling performance category because it extends the benefits of this revolutionary multimode fiber within connected buildings and data centers worldwide. Compared with OM3 and OM4, which are suitable for transmission in the range of 850nm wavelength, the new optical cabling class OM5 can operate within a range of 850nm to 950nm, thus increasing the performance and the quality of connectivity in your data center.

Meet OM5 – The Green Revolution in Fiber Optics Technology!

WBMMF or OM5 is designed to carry multiple signals generated at different short wavelengths. These signals can be aggregated for applications where high bandwidths are required through a technology called wavelength division multiplexing or WDM. In short, OM5 can accommodate multiple wavelength signals and allows them to travel simultaneously across a single fiber strand. In this way, the capacity of a fiber cable can be increased by four times.

L-com Introduces 50/125, Multimode, OM3, OM4, OM5 Fiber Cables

L-com has added over 600 new OM3, OM4 and OM5 fiber optic cable assemblies to address high speed data center applications.
Major categories in this new release include:  MPO to MPO cable assemblies for point-to-point connectivity; MPO conversion harnesses allowing users to convert from 8 fiber to 12 or 24 fiber trunks, as well as 12 fiber to 24 fiber trunks, for use in 40G and 100G multimode deployments; and MPO fan-out cables with an MPO connector on one end of the assembly and LC, SC or ST fiber connectors on the other end.

L-com Releases New OM5 Fiber Cables for High-Speed Data Center Applications

L-com has added a new series of OM5 fiber cable assemblies to address high-speed data center applications. OM5 fiber cable is able to support short wavelength division multiplexing (SWDM) which reduces the parallel fiber count by at least a factor of four. This allows for the use of just two fibers (not eight) for transmitting 40 Gbps and 100 Gbps Ethernet, thus reducing overall fiber counts typically required for higher speed applications.