Category: Fiber

Solution Brief 7: Powering the Edge

Edge Data Centers are typically smaller than a traditional data center. While EDCs often need to adapt to varying conditions based on the location, considerations for the design and construction of the facility and the availability of resources remain the same. An EDC therefore still requires an infrastructure that delivers critical power capacity essential for operations. This White Paper discusses: Supporting Rack Density, Distributing Power, Ensuring Resiliency and Availability, Improving Energy Efficiency, Deploying Proper Power Protection, Monitoring and Managing Power

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The pandemic has laid bare what rural residents have known for a long time. Rural broadband in many places is lacking. However, help is on the way. Federal and state funding programs are providing much needed assistance for rural fiber builds, and there’s never been a better time for a rural fiber build than now. This webinar will discuss design and deployment for rural networks, reviewing strategies to take fiber to the farmhouse. We’ll review the tradeoffs for various parts of the network build, and discuss concepts that may challenge some pre-conceived notions of how to deploy networks.

Simple Rule for Cleaning Optical Fibers

The performance of a fiber optic system depends heavily on the cleanliness of the interfaces. Dirt particles, grease, dust, etc. can have a highly negative impact on the transmission characteristics. They can actually destroy a fiber optic connection depending on the circumstances. If the connector is plugged in without first being tested, it could well be too late. The high pressure in the connection means that particles are immediately pressed in and this causes irreversible damage. This is why it is becoming increasingly important to test all connectors and adapters, and, if necessary, to clean them before they are mated – even new products that have just come out of the packing.

Ways to Test Equipment Cords – The Weakest Links

Equipment cords are an integral part of any network—whether it’s a fiber jumper used to make connections between fiber patching areas and switches in the data center or a copper patch cord out in the LAN to connect end devices to the work area outlet. Unfortunately, they are also typically the weakest link in the network. They are handled and manipulated more than any other component, which makes them more subject to damage. They are also often considered a commodity item and some end users will seek to save money by purchasing them from lesser-known generic sources that may skimp on quality and compliance.

How Fiber-Deep Network Solutions and 5G Can Help the Hospitality Industry Recover Post-COVID | The Signal Network Blog by Corning

Few industries were hit harder by the pandemic than hospitality.Even with the expected economic boom due to pent u p travel demand, the industry will take years to fully recover. But it’s also an opportunity for hospitality to build back better. Simultaneous with the industry’s recovery will be the widespread rollout of fiber-deep and data rich networks like 5G and WIFI6. These networks can support technologies that help hotel guests feel safer post-pandemic, and enable the industry to lay the groundwork for other high-tech services in the future.

Let’s All Calibrate Test Equipments and Have a Good Time!

Like your car’s oil can wear out over time and become less effective at properly lubricating the engine, tester components can deviate from their original behavior. Part of the process of designing an accurate tester is determining what the appropriate calibration interval should be. Fluke reviews specifications as well as looking at real world experience with the thousands of testers in use. As with any electronic, resistors, capacitors and circuits can drift over time due to temperature, humidity and warming up and cooling down every time you turn your tester on and off. The circuit boards within the tester can also be contaminated by dust or other materials.

Assessing smart buildings in the digital era

Through the input of more than 60 leading commercial real estate, asset management, technology and ICT industry leaders, the Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) in conjunction with UL, the leading global safety science company, has defined six criteria that form the basis of the SPIRE™ Smart Building Program for assessing and rating smart buildings. None of these criteria alone make a building smart, but they work together in harmony to provide a complete, balanced assessment methodology that considers the modern-day challenges that come with the increasingly digital world we live in today.