Tag: Fiber

Optical Fiber and Plastic Conduit Market to Reach $11.77 Bn, Globally, by 2026 at 20.6% CAGR

Widespread implementation of 5G, rise in adoption of fiber to the home (FTTH) connectivity, advent of the internet of things (IoT), and demand for highly secure and safe wiring systems drive the growth of the global optical fiber and plastic conduit market. However, high installation cost of optical fiber and conduits and rise of the wireless communication systems hinder the market growth. On the other hand, rise in investments in optical fiber cable (OFC) network infrastructure and emerging trends toward cable-in-conduits systems create new opportunities in the market.

Passive optical LAN: Its day is dawning

As bandwidth demands continue to increase and with copper cabling having distance shortcomings, passive optical networks looks like an alternative that can solve a number of problems. The primary driver of change from copper to optical is that the demands on the network have evolved. Every company now considers its network to be business critical where just a few years ago, it was considered best effort in nature. Downtime or a congested network meant inconvenienced users, but today they mean the business is likely losing big money.

R&M integrates optical cabling, DCIM for data center and edge mastery

R&M has launched its latest fiber-optic platform, Netscale 72, which offers RFID-based automated port documentation and visual guidance of work orders. The Netscale 72 fiber-optic distribution platform natively supports the two parallel optical cabling types — BASE8 and BASE12. This means that distribution modules for both applications fit into the same drawers of the system. Via the platform, data centers can customize trunk cabling within existing racks and enclosures, simply by changing or adding cassettes.

Meet OM5 – The Green Revolution in Fiber Optics Technology!

WBMMF or OM5 is designed to carry multiple signals generated at different short wavelengths. These signals can be aggregated for applications where high bandwidths are required through a technology called wavelength division multiplexing or WDM. In short, OM5 can accommodate multiple wavelength signals and allows them to travel simultaneously across a single fiber strand. In this way, the capacity of a fiber cable can be increased by four times.

Playing to Fiber’s Strength

Last month, I wrote about types of fiber optic sensors that are used in specialized applications. Most of these affect the transmission of light in the fiber to allow the physical parameter to be sensed either along the entire length of the fiber or at discrete points where sensors are connected to the fiber. Many of these sensors can be attached in series along a single fiber to connect up sensors over a large area and monitored using an instrument such as an optical time domain reflectometer.

The challenges of migrating optical networks to 400G

While 400G is the answer to increasing data demands, there will be an initial struggle on the network backbone in supporting these initiatives and fulfilling the promise of higher-capacity transport. 400G is not a natural extension to existing network infrastructure, and requires taking into account new restrictions and a redesign of the optical network infrastructure. 400G capacity over a single wavelength with its high baud rate is simply too spectrally wide to pass through the 50-GHz filters and fixed grid ROADMs (reconfigurable optical add-drop multiplexers). A new “runway” is required to reap the benefits of this new technology.

Quiet Light for Future Data Centers

Bringing the speed, high data capacity and low-energy use of light (optics) to advanced internet infrastructure architecture, the FRESCO team aims to solve the data center bottleneck by shortening the distance between optics and electronics through co-integration, while also drastically increasing the efficiency of transmitting extremely high data rates over few fibers using the extreme stability of “quiet light” used at the transmitting and receiving end of the interconnect.

On brief: Procedures & precautions for cutting and re-spooling fiber-optic cable

A recent evergreen technical brief, authored by Corning Cable Systems and distributed by eAnixter, takes as its premise the reality that improper use of a cable re-spooler can cause damage to fiber-optic cable jackets or, in tight buffered cables, result in wavy fiber due to cable crossovers or excessive tensile loading. The document provides a recommended procedure for cutting and respooling fiber-optic cables.