Tag: Covid-19

Returning to Venues During COVID-19

Technology can help restore confidence in returning to large venues by monitoring visitor temperatures and movements. Solutions to COVID-19 monitoring and compliance require an ecosystem of technology manufacturers, working together to develop solutions for venues of all types. There are four key technologies that provide solutions: Network Connectivity, Location & Analytic Systems, Sensors and Software applications.

The Digital Disruption for Post-COVID Construction

Like all industries, construction has been shaken by the COVID-19 pandemic and is now being forced to adapt in order to operate in a heightened health and safety environment focused on social distancing. This disruption is fundamentally impeding conventional construction approaches and forcing even the most traditional companies to look for modern solutions. Now, promising digital technologies that have been struggling to break established construction markets are emerging as saviors of post-COVID construction.

Tech Takes on COVID-19

What will workplaces look like as they begin to reopen from the coronavirus? Will contact tracing with smartphones locate, track and report potential carriers? Will temperature and fever detection become required to gain access to a facility or enterprise? Will prescreening and validation processes be a prerequisite to on-site visits?

How To Survive the Coronavirus and Thrive

Data centers remain crucial to businesses’ survival during the pandemic. As more companies transition into remote work, their use of cloud services has skyrocketed. This rapid adoption wouldn’t be possible without the versatility and provision of data centers. Cloud usage aside, internet traffic has increased as a whole, putting more pressure on data centers. Without a reliable network, much of life in quarantine wouldn’t be possible. If data centers weren’t as robust as they are, this heightened traffic could have meant disaster.

Black Swans and Fiber Networks

A black swan event is defined as “an unpredictable event that is beyond what is normally expected of a situation and has potentially severe consequences.” The phrase originated because people assumed that black swans didn’t exist because nobody had recorded seeing one – until finally someone did. It turned out black swans existed but were extremely rare, and it was hard to predict when or where someone would encounter one. The COVID-19 pandemic in some ways has been a black swan event, and the communications sector has been no exception. One impact on our sector is that data traffic has shot up at an unprecedented rate, a result of schools closing and orders to shelter in place and work from home. This experience is one example of a fundamental truth of network design: patterns of demand in data traffic are hard to predict (other than that they will grow rapidly on average). The solution is to focus on building physical access networks that have the capacity to respond to changing demands, and the accessibility to make use of that capacity where and when it is needed.

Broadband is critical for unlocking the lockdown

The global crisis created by COVID-19 will have a profound and long-lasting impact. Broadband has played a vital role during this crisis as people work, study and shop from home. These changes in digital behavior have had a seismic effect on our networks. Until now, broadband operators have been using growth models that predicted a gradual increase in bandwidth demand of 30-40% over the next 3 or 4 years. COVID-19 has generated 30-40% growth overnight. We’ve seen huge spikes in usage across online gaming, VPN, streaming services, social media and video conferencing, to name a few.

COVID-19 Lockdown Leaves Empty Smart Buildings to Ponder Their Failings

To date, the smart building’s health applications have focused on maintaining the best indoor temperature for occupants, developing lighting in tune with the human circadian rhythm, or improving air quality with sensors-enabled ventilation. While all these systems do support general health and, therefore, an improved ability to fight disease, they do not help control the spread of coronavirus. With many experts claiming that this kind of pandemic may become more common in the decades ahead, the smart building may need to start looking into its in-depth toolkit to see how it can help.

How COVID-19 May Change Technology Usage in Different Markets

As we adjust to new ways of living and working amid this global pandemic, an interesting question arises: How will these shifts impact us long term? Will COVID-19 serve as a change agent, transforming the way we use technology? Recent technology advancements are doing more than changing how we work. They’re helping us adhere to social distancing and stay-at-home orders, keeping non-essential workers at home while those on the frontlines head out every day to help fight this battle. Without our progress toward faster speeds, more bandwidth and applications such as videoconferencing, many of us would be struggling much more than we are to get work done, keep in touch with family and even keep food delivered to our front door—without having to leave our homes.